Preemie Christmas Part 10

Having a cold can really derail things. 

On the 10th day of Christmas, the NICU gave to me: 10 specialists a-knocking, 9 dads kangaroo-ing, 8 moms a – pumping, 7 monitors chiming, 6 nurses charting, 5 needle sticks, 4 brain surgeries, 3 minute scrubs, 2 blood transfusions, and a micro preemie in an isolette. 

Preemies are often “followed” by various specialists in the nicu. Depending on their specific health concerns, some babies could be followed by several doctors in addition to the normal neonatologists. 
Little Miss Minion had a very diverse medical team looking after her during her 3 months, so get ready to meet them! 

1. Neonatologist: a doctor who specializes in preterm/newborn babies. These are the main doctors of the NICU. Every baby in the nicu is followed by the neonatologists. 

2. Respiratory therapists. These people are assigned to babies who are using any kind of breathing assistance, whether it’s a ventilator, CPAP, or cannula. They come in periodically and check the settings, adjust hoses, and generally make sure that everything is working perfectly. 

3. Physical therapists.  Even in the nicu, physical therapy is a big deal. PT is there to create a plan to keep baby’s muscles developing properly. Babies in utero have the resistance of the womb to push against, while “outside babies” have nothing but the special beds of the nicu, which aren’t quite the same. PTs are also the main players in keeping the baby from developing a flat head and/or torticollis, which is imbalanced neck muscles. 

4. Occupational therapists. This one threw me a little at first. What could a Preemie possibly need with occupational therapy? Turns out, they serve a pretty important purpose: setting the plan for baby to learn to use a bottle. Many preemies find bottle feeding to be easier than breastfeeding, Little Miss Minion included (see my previous posts about the joys of pumping). The occupational therapist determines the best position for each baby to feed in, the size of bottle nipple, and they pin point the stress cues that each baby exhibits during a feed. Little Miss Minion was fed by “pace feeding,” which is when the baby is propped up like they are sitting in a chair and the bottle is only slightly inclined. This allows the parent to control the flow of milk. She used an Ultra Preemie nipple for several months before graduating to the regular preemie nipple, and then FINALLY the regular newborn nipple. 

5. Opthalmologist. This is a medical eye doctor. Many micro preemies develop ROP, or retinopathy of prematurity. This doctor’s job is to monitor eye development and see if ROP is occurring or if other issues are happening in the eyes. 

6. Pediatric neurologist. This is a doctor who specializes in the workings of the brain. They make sure that the brain is functioning correctly, that the messages are being transmitted and received. This doctor can easily be confused with…
7. Neurosurgeon. This doctor also specializes in the brain, but in the physical function of it. In Little Miss Minion’s case, the neurosurgeon monitors her hydrocephalus and makes sure her shunts are working. 
8. Lactation specialist. This is a person trained to help new moms breastfeed or pump. 

9. Nicu follow up team. This is a group of nicu personnel who test and measure the progress that the preemie makes once they graduate the nicu until they turn 2 or 3. 

10. Pediatrician. This is the doctor that the preemie will see once they graduate. 

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