Tag Archive | preeclampsia

Three Years of Blogging

Three years ago, I started this blog as a way to update friends and family about what was going on with Little Miss Minion. Our cell phones were blowing up with messages and phone calls, all wanting to know the latest on our little family. It was nice that so many people wanted to know how we were doing, but cell phones are a NICU nightmare for germs. I created this blog as a way to update everyone at the same time, reducing our need to touch our phones while in the NICU, and cutting out the time it took to answer everyone individually. This let us have more time to spend together, sitting on the couch in our room in the NICU, staring at the tiny little human growing in the incubator.

To everyone who reads this, thanks for being a part of our NICU journey.

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Happy 3rd Birthday!

Little Miss Minion turned three about ten minutes ago. It’s hard to believe that we started this journey three years ago with a one pound fourteen ounce 28 weeker and now we’ve got a little kid who just graduated from all of her therapies and loves to give hugs and eat cheese its.

We are so lucky.

Advocacy Day

As I mentioned before, our Minion family was invited to join other families in a trek to the state capital for the March of Dimes Advocacy Day. It was the first Minion Family Roadtrip!

We drove up the night before Advocacy Day and stayed in a hotel (graciously supplied by the March of Dimes). Little Miss Minion serenaded us for about half of the drive with a mashup of “twinkle twinkle little star” and the alphabet. We had hoped that she would fall asleep, but that only happened in the last thirty minutes of the drive.

We arrived at the hotel and checked in, brought up our luggage, and crashed. Little Miss Minion does not sleep in our bed at home, so she was very excited that Mr Minion and I were joining her. The catch is that she likes to sleep on her back, starfish style. And she’s never used a pillow. So that was an interesting several hours.

We woke up, got cleaned up, and sat down for breakfast (which was surprisingly good), and then made the short trip into the capital. After parking and walking to the building, we found ourselves inside the huge building and wandered until we found the March of Dimes area. There is large open area where different lobby groups can reserve space with tables and chairs for their members to wait between meeting their representatives. It’s kind of like home base. We met up with the group there and read over the materials we had been given. For each meeting we had scheduled, we had a folder with the information about the two bills we were lobbying for, information about how the bills could help people, and our personal stories. Several weeks earlier, we had been given a template to fill out that would share our own story with the NICU. We were also given a folder that contained copies of everything for us, including our schedule.

Our first meeting went well, and our personal story was well received. Having told the story WITH Little Miss Minion present and WITHOUT, it’s much easier for the audience to tell it with her there. People don’t expect good things when you start off with “28 weeks, and weighed 1 pound 14 ounces” and you can’t really blame them.

Our other meetings were good, and we got to sit in on a session of the House. The March of Dimes presented one of the representatives with an award for her work on the house bill. We were provided with a great catered lunch from Panera in between our meetings, and there had been water and soft drinks in a large cooler available as well.

It was so nice to see our primary nurse J again. I see her every once in a while when I run into her in the NICU but she hadn’t seen LMM since her 1st birthday. And Little Miss Minion was so well behaved the whole time. She got a little fussy towards the end of the day, but that was it. She slept most of the way home, and we were all in bed by around 7:30 that night. It was a long day, but a fun and rewarding one. I hope we can do it again next year!

March of Dimes

I have some exciting news! One of Little Miss Minion’s primary nurses has stayed in contact with us since we left the NICU. We have been invited to present our story to our state senators and representatives in March! We will be part of an Advocacy Day for the March of Dimes, which is an organization that does tons of research on prematurity and birth defects.

This visit will entail meetings with our local representatives and telling them about our experience in the NICU. I’m assuming the purpose is to help keep funding or grants or something. More details on that later. I’ll be working on a short explanation of my pregnancy complications and of LMM’s NICU stay and complications.

I don’t have a ton of info yet, but I’m so excited (and nervous) to be able to help this organization.

NICU Developmental Clinic

Every six months since she graduated from the NICU, Little Miss Minion has gone to the NICU Developmental Clinic for follow ups. Our first visit was nerve wracking. Only a week after graduating from the nicu, I had to transport my three month old to a medical center full of little kids (aka germ cesspools) and see how she was measuring up to her chronological age (spoiler alert:not very well, as was expected). We talked about her NICU stay…how she had come early due to my preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome…how she had stayed 84 days and developed sepsis, meningitis, and hydrocephalus…how she had endured brain surgery at 6 weeks old. They had me feed her, so they could see how she was handling the bottle and the Super Preemie sized bottle nipples. I left feeling like this was going to be our lives forever–shuffling her to and from various doctors and specialists. The weeks and months after that were as I’d expected. We saw pediatric neurologists, opthalmogists, hearing specialists, physical therapists, speech therapists, neurosurgeons, and our regular pediatrician. But as the months went on, the number of specialists began to dwindle as she “graduated” from their services. 

Today, LMM graduated from the NICU Developmental Clinic. I won’t have the official results for a couple of weeks yet, but here are some quotes from today’s appointment. 

“She’s absolutely perfect.”

“I can’t believe she has two shunts and presents like this.”

“I ran out of tests for this category. She blew it out of the water.”

“Didn’t she have some PVL (essentially, brain damage)? I am amazed at her development.”

The only thing we need to keep working with her on is expressive speech. The current theory is that she knows the words if they are given to her, but she has trouble “finding” them when she wants to use them. For example, if you give her a series of pictures and ask where is X, she will find it every time. But take those same pictures and ask “what’s that” and she has trouble. 

I’m happy to cross out another specialist from our list. If I’m not mistaken, this takes her down to just a pediatrician and a neurosurgeon, plus our early intervention team. She graduates from them this spring…and might even test out of the school district program that the early intervention shifts into at age three. 

All in all, it’s been a good day in the Minion household. 

Two Years

Two years ago today, I was in a hospital bed on day 2 of hopefully many more on bedrest. I was getting frequent visits from my medical team, consisting of nurses, doctors, specialists, maternal fetal medicine, my OB, and two people from the nicu. My OB was hoping to keep Little Miss Minion and I healthy enough to make it to 32 weeks. The maternal fetal medicine specialist (high risk doctor) gave us two weeks in a best case scenario, which would have put us at 30 weeks. I don’t remember who the nicu people were or what their positions in the unit were, but I remember the feeling of panic as they explained all the things they could do if Little Miss Minion had to come early. I remember words like resuscitation, breathing tube, ventilator, developmental delay, and prognosis. I remember thinking that there were an awful lot of people coming in and out of the room during the time the nicu people were with us. 
When Mr Minion went back to our house to grab more clothes and things, since we weren’t expecting me to be admitted the day before, I remember starting to have trouble reading my book. The words weren’t making sense. I read the same paragraph over and over before finally giving up. I sat in my bed, trying to ignore the uncomfortable straps of the monitoring belt wrapped around my stomach. I watched the numbers on my blood pressure readings slowly climb, trying to will them back down. 150/90, 175/95…my prepregnancy readings were usually around 110/70 or lower. One of the nurses came in to check on me and moved the monitor screen to face away from me. With nothing else to look at, I watched the line of the fetal monitoring contraception move. Every jump indicated that Little Miss Minion was doing well, moving around. After a while, the line seemed to be flattening out. I called the nurse, they did a bunch of stuff to try and get Little Miss Minion moving, and nothing worked. They called in an ultrasound team who did a biophysical profile on her. It’s a half hour ultrasound where they count how many times the baby moves and a couple other things. She didn’t move. I watched her heart beat, the only thing that moved on the screen. 

Soon after that, I suspect an urgent  conference of my medical team commenced and a few minutes later, I was on the phone with Mr Minion, who had gotten to the house and wanted to know if I had thought of anything else I wanted. The doctor came in, so I got off the phone. I remember him telling me that my blood pressure wasn’t responding to the magnesium anymore and that Little Miss Minion needed out. Tonight. As soon as they could prep me.
I called Mr Minion and told him. As I hung up, swarms of people poured into the room to get me ready. I continued to call and text people that they were prepping me for surgery and that the baby was coming. And the rest is history. 
Today, I watched my two year old daughter play with bubbles. She ran up and down the hall of our house, played in her sandbox, and drew on an easel with markers. Two years ago, I watched a blue screen descend in front of my face as a team of doctors and nurses saved my life and saved my daughter’s life. I watched as someone held out a tiny, tiny, tiny baby, her head engulfed in a newborn hat that was almost as big as she was, her skin purple and transparent. Everything I had expected was imploding before my eyes. 
Two years ago, our NICU rollercoaster ride began. It started with a stomach churning drop as our one pound, fourteen ounce preemie was brought into the world twelve weeks early. There was another drop over a cliff as she fought off gbs, sepsis, and meningitis. Things smoothed out as we turned the corner of what would be our halfway point. We shot down another towering drop as we found out about her brain damage and hydrocephalus. The subsequent surgery and recovery were bumpy. But then, we could see the exit. Eighty four days after starting this ride, we got off and started the rest of our lives. There are still bumps, potholes, rainy days, and times when we trip and fall. But the important thing is that we get up, dust ourselves off, and KEEP GOING. 
Happy birthday to my daughter, Little Miss Minion. I’m so happy I get to see you grow up. 

May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month!

As frequent readers of this blog will know, my daughter, Little Miss Minion, was born early because I developed severe early onset Preeclampsia. This month is Preeclampsia awareness month, so I will be sharing information about this very important medical condition and how it has affected me and my family. 

Fact: Preeclampsia occurs in 2-8% of all pregnancies.

Fact: preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders are on of the leading causes of maternal death worldwide.